Welcome to Bricks in Motion!
We are an online filmmaking community devoted to the art of stop-motion animation. Most of our films, sometimes called brickfilms or LEGO movies, are created using LEGO® and other plastic brick building toys. In addition to an active community forum for filmmakers, this site is home to an ever-growing directory of films submitted by our users.

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This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is The Artist by Mirko Horstmann.


Instead of looking outward toward the wide world, many films turn inward to examine the process of filmmaking, artistry and creativity. The Artist, by Mirko Horstmann and released in 2007, is one of those films. This quiet film follows the struggle of a sculptor attempting to get into an art gallery, and probably resonates with any creative person who’s had to deal with trying to get their artwork accepted. The Artist won Best Film in Steinerei 2007 (a German brickfilm film festival) and first place in a Brickfilms.com contest simply known as the TTC Contest (a contest designed to promote the Theora video codec). Mirko Horstmann was a well-known German member of Brickfilms.com, and also made a few other brickfilms, including Greedy Bricksand The Fisherman and his Wife.


Watch The Artist on YouTubeand then head over to the spoilery discussion thread to discuss with your fellow brickfilmers!

By Nathan Wells on March 27, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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Hello and welcome, one and all! After a momentary hiatus (read: 3 years), Nathan Wells and Zach Macias are proud to present the nominees for the 2014 Bricks in Motion Awards! This is a (sort of) annual awards event that recognizes and celebrates excellence in brickfilming in a wide variety of categories and disciplines. Think like the Oscars for brickfilms.


Our panel of judges have sorted through a year’s worth of films and voted on them in 11 individual categories until a final list of 5 nominees was agreed upon for each category. Very soon, we will be sending out the final ballots, and once those votes are tallied and winners chosen, they will be announced via a live awards show in the Bricks in Motion IRC Chat (more details on that later).


Check out the announcement thread to read up on all of the nominees!

By Nathan Wells on March 23, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is The Peril of Doc Ock by Tony Mines and Tim Drage.


This was it. This was the moment that many brickfilmers got their first taste of just how expansive, dynamic, cinematic and professional brickfilms could look. Sure, Tony Mines and Tim Drage has made other great brickfilms before, most of them for the LEGO Company, but The Peril of Doc Ock is arguably the first professionally-produced brickfilm that captured the adrenaline-pumping action of a Hollywood blockbuster. Released in 2004, The Peril of Doc Ock made a big splash in the brickfilm community, and influenced many brickfilmings including Zach “MindGame” Macias. Tony Mines and Tim Drage, the talent behind Spite Your Face Productions, also created brickfilms like All of the Dead and One: A Space Odyssey before getting their big LEGO break with Monty Python and the Holy Grail in LEGO. This grabbed the attention of The LEGO Group, and Spite Your Face went on to make The Han Solo Affair and The Peril of Doc Ock for The LEGO Group.


Watch The Peril of Doc Ock on YouTubeand then head over to the spoilery discussion thread to discuss with your fellow brickfilmers!

By Nathan Wells on March 20, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This featured brickfilmer post is part of a series of articles highlighting animators who supported the Bricks in Motion Documentary project on Kickstarter.


Michael Tourette (HoldingOurOwn) is an enthusiast of toys and 1980s culture, a LEGO animator, and a married Catholic and father.  He received his first Lego set in the 1970s, at the age of 3.  He returned to Lego as an adult in 1999 with the release of Lego's first licensed property: Star Wars: Episode I.  Tourette first became interested in Brickfilming after discovering the medium in a 2011 issue of BrickJournal.  After reading about it, he began watching brickfilms online. Of the brickfilms he watched, Chris Allbee's Joe Brickmond was what inspired him most. He praises the series for its deep characterization.


Read the rest, and discuss this animator!

By Sméagol on March 16, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is Robota by Marc Beurteaux.


Typically, brickfilming is a fairly insular hobby. Brickfilmers know of each other and other brickfilm’s work, but it’s rare for brickfilmers to break out into other notable work, and it’s equally rare for other filmmakers indulge in brickfilming. Marc Beurteaux, an animator and director from Canada, is an exception. His film Robota is his only brickfilm, but he’s contributed animation to TV series and shorts. Robota made the festival circuit and has won many awards, all detailed on the Brickfilms Wiki page hereRobota is follows the story of a broken robot trying to survive in a robot world, and features large puppets built out of LEGO and other construction toys. It features some of the biggest models and sets ever seen in a brickfilm.


Watch Robota on the Brickfilms Archiveand then head over to the spoilery discussion thread to discuss with your fellow brickfilmers!

By Nathan Wells on March 13, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This featured brickfilmer post is part of a series of articles highlighting animators who supported the Bricks in Motion Documentary project on Kickstarter.


Avery Drake has been making animations since 2009. He has had a lifelong interest in animation and in filmmaking, and is currently pursuing it at West Liberty University, studying Digital Media Design.


Read the rest, and discuss this animator!

By Sméagol on March 9, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is The Letter by James Maduzia.


Comedy is a strange, fickle beast. Everyone has different opinions on what is funny, and what isn’t funny. Different styles of comedy come and go, but if you’ve ever sat in a film class or movie theater and watched the old classic films by Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin, you’ll realize that good old slapstick will always entertain. The Letter is the perfect encapsulation of classic slapstick in LEGO form. Released in 2003, this brickfilm quickly became an instant classic, and has often been cited in articles about brickfilming. James Maduzia made one other brickfilm Zero Gravity Rebellion, also a classic, and was interviewed by Brickfilms.com. While he only made two brickfilms, they both made a big impact on the brickfilms community.


Watch The Letter on YouTubeand then head over to the spoilery discussion thread to discuss with your fellow brickfilmers!

By Nathan Wells on March 6, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This featured brickfilmer post is part of a series of articles highlighting animators who supported the Bricks in Motion Documentary project on Kickstarter.


Jack Campise began making videos in 2007.  In that time, he has made a number of brickfilms and short live action films.


In 2012, he used crowdfunding to raise funds for a Batman fanfilm which he would spend the next three years completing, The Legend of the Bat.


Discuss this animator on the forums

By Sméagol on March 2, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is Dr. Jobs and his Scary Laboratory by Fumitaka Anzai.


Brickfilming is, like LEGO itself, an international phenomenon. Our beloved plastic bricks transcend international borders and language barriers with ease, and we’ve seen brickfilms and brickfilmers from around the world. However, while we’ve seen plenty of brickfilms from North America, Europe and Oceania, we’ve essentially seen no brickfilms from Asia. Dr. Jobs and his Scary Laboratory by Fumitaka Anzai is an exception. Released in 2005, this brickfilm caused a stir thanks to its impressive visual effects and extremely smooth animation that essentially had never before been achieved with LEGO. While Fumitaka Anzai did post this film on Brickfilms.com, he was not an active member, and very little is known about him.


Watch Dr. Jobs and his Scary Laboratory on YouTubeand then head over to the spoilery discussion thread to discuss with your fellow brickfilmers!

By Nathan Wells on February 27, 2015, Comments (0), Share

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After months of preparation, I am pleased to announce the Brickfilms Wiki. Thanks to the fantastic work of sillypenta and BoatsAreRockable, and the assistance of rockydude411, dewfilms, Squash, AquaMorph and Rioforce, we're proud to present a community wiki designed to catalog notable brickfilms and brickfilmers.


The Brickfilms Wiki is open to all to edit and contribute, but, like all wikis, contributors must follow our Code of Conduct and Formatting Guidelines. Not every kind of page will be accepted, and the wiki core team (myself, Penta and Boats) will be keeping an eye on the wiki to make sure the wiki retains its high standards.


Check out the annoucement thread with more info here!

By Nathan Wells on February 23, 2015, Comments (0), Share