Topic: We shaped The LEGO Movie

Now we know but it went further than that.  Discuss.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVe5XPU10Zc

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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

The video was informative, but still only skimmed the surface. I felt like the example clips they showed were just random videos that weren't influential. It's a good video for people who don't know anything about TLM, but all the info in it (and more) is already known by the brickfilming community.

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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

Maybe so, but I don't think this video was necessarily for the birckfilming community as much as for the public in general. Yes, it only skimmed the surface, but it gives a basic explanation of what it is to be a brickfilmer to people who wouldn't of known about it. Plus it's nice to see a video about brickfilming at #18 on trending on YouTube in 2017.

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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

rioforce wrote:

I felt like the example clips they showed were just random videos that weren't influential.

Apart from Journey to the Moon and The Magic Portal, the clips used are from films that were uploaded to Archive.org, where every upload is technically considered to be royalty-free. It does mean that they accidentally actually managed to include real community members of old such as Stefan, Lieberman Bros, Captain Bulldog, TwoBit, Yanzl and more (and they did manage to include highly influential films by Spite Your Face). Even though they wouldn't be aware of how right they got it, it was much nicer to see than just a compilation of unimportant films that managed to get millions of views on YouTube in recent years, which is what I expected.

Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

I liked the video quite a bit, Vox usually does a good stuff so it was cool to see something I'm passionate about get some love. I agree with Penta, while most of the clips weren't the most "important" to the grand story of brickfilming, I think they showed quite well what an average brickfilm looks like, it gives a good sense of what it's all about and the ways in which it inspired the LEGO Movie.

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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

Until now, I would have thought the Magic Portal was the earliest brickfilm in existence.  Now I know there was something from the 70s and that Lindsay Fleay worked for Animal Logic and left an impression.

EDIT: Also, just noticed my 12 Pains is part of the collage mini/bigsmile
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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

Penta wrote:
rioforce wrote:

I felt like the example clips they showed were just random videos that weren't influential.

Apart from Journey to the Moon and The Magic Portal, the clips used are from films that were uploaded to Archive.org, where every upload is technically considered to be royalty-free. It does mean that they accidentally actually managed to include real community members of old such as Stefan, Lieberman Bros, Captain Bulldog, TwoBit, Yanzl and more (and they did manage to include highly influential films by Spite Your Face). Even though they wouldn't be aware of how right they got it, it was much nicer to see than just a compilation of unimportant films that managed to get millions of views on YouTube in recent years, which is what I expected.

Yeah, I have to agree with Penta on this one.  While it wasn't nostalgic for me per se since I was never a member of the Brickfilms.com of old, it made me happy to see that the more "classic" Brickfilms were given attention instead of X number of "star wars batman indiana jones leggo muvvie" clips or endless Forrestfire videos or that badly-animated Force Awakens trailer that went viral 48 hours after the real one came out (you know which one I'm talking about...).  These days it seems that whenever something Brickfilm-related gets news coverage, it's invariably because it's a recreation of a trailer or otherwise tied to pre-existing franchise--so it's nice to see a mainstream (for want of a better word) media outlet actually do their research and not just copy-paste the top 10 YouTube results that pop up.  (My suspicions regarding popularity were confirmed when an admittedly cursory look at the comments section reveals that a bunch of people keep mentioning Forrestfire and Michael Hickox instead of other more groundbreaking and arguably talented Brickfilmers.)

That said, I was kind of surprised when the video stated that 12 frames was the norm, since as far as I'm aware it's 15 FPS that is considered the standard frame rate.  Was this standard first established after the Brickfilm.com days?

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Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

So far as my limited experience goes, 12 was pretty much the go-to in the early days. It was easy math, and, just guessing, many of the early editors and equipment may have been only compatible with 24 and/or 12. Certainly, the film cameras used by the pioneers of brickfilming would have mandated that.

By the time I came along, software had become much more versatile, and 15 was the new go-to, for a slightly more smooth and life-like motion that didn't require the work, time, or tedium of 24.

I'm not sure exactly when, or how, the change came to be, as I rarely hear of anyone using 12 anymore.


Anywho, like the others, I appreciated the research, and history of the video. It wasn't meant to be an extended history, nor a documentary, and I think, for what it was meant to accomplish, it was very well put together.

Re: We shaped The LEGO Movie

15 was the standard in the Brickfilms.com era.