Topic: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

This week’s Brickfilm of the Week is The Peril of Doc Ock by Tony Mines and Tim Drage.

This was it. This was the moment that many brickfilmers got their first taste of just how expansive, dynamic, cinematic and professional brickfilms could look. Sure, Tony Mines and Tim Drage had made other great brickfilms before, most of them for the LEGO Company, but The Peril of Doc Ock is arguably the first professionally-produced brickfilm that captured the adrenaline-pumping action of a Hollywood blockbuster. Released in 2004, The Peril of Doc Ock made a big splash in the brickfilm community, and influenced many brickfilmers including Zach “MindGame” Macias. Tony Mines and Tim Drage, the talent behind Spite Your Face Productions, also created brickfilms like All of the Dead and One: A Space Odyssey before getting their big LEGO break with Monty Python and the Holy Grail in LEGO. This grabbed the attention of The LEGO Group, and Spite Your Face went on to make The Han Solo Affair and The Peril of Doc Ock for The LEGO Group.


Watch The Peril of Doc Ock on YouTube

http://i.imgur.com/ZkTmxpz.png

SPOILERY DISCUSSION BELOW!

Thanks to the skill of Spite Your Face, The Peril of Doc Ock achieved a polish in brickfilming that wouldn’t be matched by many others until half a decade later. With a charming mix of humor and action, this film was also a great marketing tool for The LEGO Group and Sony, for the release of Spider-Man 2. The Peril of Doc Ock also comes with an alternate ending, and includes some of my favorite animation at 2:40. Recently, Spite Your Face has launched a Tumblr blog that has been revealing lots of behind the scenes info about The Peril of Doc Ock and other Spite Your Face productions.

What are your thoughts on The Peril of Doc Ock? What did you like about it? What did you think of the animation and action scenes? Did you have a favorite moment?

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

This film will always hold a dear place in my heart. It's not one of my major influences, it's the film that pretty much got me into brickfilming in the first place. I had been introduced to stop-motion earlier in the summer of 2004 and saw this a few months later, and only after being completely blown away by it over and over (I must have watched it at least 5 times in that very first sitting) that I was able to connect the dots between my newfound hobby and all the LEGO sets gathering dust in the back of my closet.

Even years later, the film just looks great. The scale of the set design is marvelous, as is its integration of miniatures into the overall cityscape (it only occurred to me years later that the establishing shot of the Daily Bugle was a miniature). Also, for being a film without dialogue, it relies primarily on visual sight gags and musical/sound cues to sell the comedy, which gives it a lighthearted, appropriately-comic bookish charm. It's a wonderful little self-contained superhero story with a clear beginning, middle, and end packaged into a brisk 3.5 minutes.

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

The first brickfilm I ever saw was Monty Python and the Holy Grail in LEGO, and that by itself really made me want to get into brickfilming, although I didn't until 2007.

I saw this little gem in 2004 when I was at a LEGO Store someplace around D.C. I do believe that it was the second brickfilm I ever saw, and I was really impressed with it, which made me want to make brickfilms even more.

-Squid, Head of ANP |  I am the Night

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

All of the Dead was the most influential Spite Your Face Production on my early brickfilming days. It directly influenced the style of the early Reels About Nothing films Brian and I made after seeing it, in conjunction with Plan 9 From Outer Space sort of changed the way I viewed film making, I think I watch Plan 9 four times in a row after seeing it because I was so amazed at it's level of incompetence  coupled with a clear creative directorial vision.

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

When we interviewed Spite Your Face in Berlin for the documentary, Tony mentioned that the alternate ending was the original ending and they made a new one on TLG's request.

http://i.imgur.com/wcmcdmf.png

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

BTW the gentlemen themselves as seen in the documentary. Tony on the left, Tim on the right:

http://i.imgur.com/YHp8TfE.png

http://i.imgur.com/wcmcdmf.png

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

Whow! If you would've told me this was made in 2010 i would've probably believed it. Haven't seen it before, but this is absolutely amazing!

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Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

Probably the most influential brickfilm of our time, the animation, cinematography, and special effects can still hold up very well more than ten years later.

Have you seen a big-chinned boy?

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

I've never even heard of these guys, or seen their films. I guess I've got homework to do.

http://i.imgur.com/VlQMyOs.png
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Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

That's surprising, I though everyone around here knew about Spite Your Face. The LEGO Camelot song was the first brickfilm I saw, though I didn't realize it until much later. I first saw The Peril of Doc Ock when I went looking for the creators of the Camelot film on YouTube. I was blown away by it as someone who had just really discovered stop-motion as something I might be interested in.

Re: Brickfilm of the Week: The Peril of Doc Ock (Mar 20, 2015)

I've definitely heard of them before, but i have to admit that i haven't seen a single movie by them until now.

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