Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

asianfilms101 wrote:

What adapter would be good for a T2i and one of these lenses?

There are lots of options, this is relatively inexpensive while being well reviewed.

You can buy that or search for other Nikkor F to Canon EOS adapters.

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Update!

I have created a video version of this which some people may find more helpful picking a lens, as I do show some of the differences with a few reference clips.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8106/28115448244_5f59cb498b_z.jpg
(Click to watch)

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Hey Sloth, thanks for making this page. I have been referencing it a ton while I've been doing my research on camera lenses to buy. I have one question though. Does it matter if the lens is Ai, Ai-s, or Non-Ai? I have been trying to figure out what will work, and all of it has been rather confusing. I just purchased a Canon T5i, so I have been looking at the Nikkor 35mm F/2.8 that you recommended and I found this one for a great price: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Nikkor-35 … SwEzxYQCN~ . The issue is, I don't know if it will work with the Fotodiox Lens Mount adapter (https://www.amazon.ca/Fotodiox-Mount-Ad … dy+adapter) because it is "Non-Ai". If you could answer it would be greatly appreciated.

-BrickBrosProductions

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

There's a good conversation about AI and non-AI lenses on page 2 of this thread.

But to sum it up, they don't matter if it's AI or non AI when using an adapter on a Canon camera. What does matter is if you have a newer Nikon camera (the AI part might mess up something on the camera body around the lens socket, but I don't know specifically right now).

I have that exact adapter and it works like a charm.

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I was thinking about getting a Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/3.5 sometime soon, but I just wanted to make sure of something. I don't really know much about buying lenses, but basically, if I'm looking for a Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/3.5 to use for stop-motion, it can be any lens that has all those words in it's name, right? It doesn't matter if its AI or non-AI or Manual? Or if it says Nippon Kogaku Japan on it?

I'd be using it with a Canon DSLR and an adapter, by the way.

Last edited by twickabrick (December 3, 2016 (02:32pm))

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I got the Non-Ai and it's been working pretty dope so far, I'm getting some real sharp stuff. I'd say go for it, but maybe wait for what other people have to say. I've heard people saying that Ai is sharper than Non-Ai, but that might only apply to other specific lenses.

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

On the 24mm and 35mm lenses the the AI versions are sharper but any micro Nikkor should be really sharp, the non-AI versions are just a litter older, but those Micros were some of the sharpest lenses they have made.

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I'm thinking of buying this lens from Ebay. It's condition is described as follows:

The lens works properly and shows normal signs of use with small marks on the finish. The aperture ring works properly. The focusing ring works smoothly but does have a dry spot. The glass is clean with no fungus or haze internally but does have coating marks onthe front element.

I don't know exactly what all of this means, but does any of this seem like it'd be a big problem?

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

It appears we share our love of vintage Nikkor lenses twickabrick! mini/wink It doesn't seems like it should give you any trouble, but it wouldn't be my first choice for a stopmotion lens. If you want a good old Nikkor lens, this one for a zoom and this one for a prime. The prime one is more pricy, but is as good a prime lenses come (in my opinion). Also, MF is better, but since you're using a Canon DSLR with an adapter, the adapter will not allow AF. You will also need a set of macro filters. Hope this helps.

-Brickman

Last edited by Brickman (December 19, 2016 (11:33am))

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I wouldn't suggest using those lenses Brickman, just due to short minimum focal lengths, which is why I suggest using the Micro lens, a good micro lens is one of the best options you can get for stop motion and twickabrick was on the right track, the 'dry spot' in focus would be a negative if he was using it for less controlled photography but will be fine in stop motion. Although this lens is in much better condition (and is a bit more modern) and comes with an extention tube, which will allow for extreme close ups.

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Just found this from the highlighted topic section, and I want to say that this has definitely been the most helpful guide to getting lenses for animation that I have ever found! mini/bigsmile

However, I do have a question. I am going to be getting my first DSLR soon (most likely going to be a Canon 700D (Rebel T5i), and I could buy it along with a 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens for an extra £20, so my question is would it be worthing getting that lens or would it be better to save the money for one of the lenses you recommended? And would it be worth getting the camera soon if I could only get 1 or 2 lenses for the moment or would it be better to wait for a bit longer and get twice as many lenses? Thanks!

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I'm no sloth, but wether or not you want the kit lens will depend one what else you plan to use the camera for.  For stop motion you may end up being limited to using it with the aperture wide open to avoid light flicker, so that can be an issue, but if you plan on using it for causal photos and [live action] video in auto mode, then the kit lens would be a good idea.

I wouldn't worry to much about getting a bunch of lenses right away, as framing works off the proportion between the size of the objects and the distance from them, so as long as you have plenty of room around your set you should be able to get a decent variety of framings from just a few lenses, (assuming they have a good minimum focal distance and/or extension tubes/macro adaptors if necessary) by moving the camera closer to, or further away from the set. Just like people do with a web cam. mini/smile

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

MarkNelsonMovies wrote:

I'm no sloth, but wether or not you want the kit lens will depend one what else you plan to use the camera for.  For stop motion you may end up being limited to using it with the aperture wide open to avoid light flicker, so that can be an issue, but if you plan on using it for causal photos and [live action] video in auto mode, then the kit lens would be a good idea.

I wouldn't worry to much about getting a bunch of lenses right away, as framing works off the proportion between the size of the objects and the distance from them, so as long as you have plenty of room around your set you should be able to get a decent variety of framings from just a few lenses, (assuming they have a good minimum focal distance and/or extension tubes/macro adaptors if necessary) by moving the camera closer to, or further away from the set. Just like people do with a web cam. mini/smile

Ok, thanks. Probably the only other thing I will be using the camera for is photos with a telephoto lens, so I will probably be getting a telephoto lens at the same time that I buy the camera. I will do some more research on other lenses, but thanks for the help! mini/smile

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

I'm gonna throw my two cents in here and say get a kit lens. With your first DSLR, it's important to get a kit. You get to learn a lot about different focal lengths and you get the freedom to decide which one you want without having to spend a wallet full of cash on lenses. Canon kit lenses aren't too shabby and rarely have issues with animation (see: ForlornCreature), though the general style of the lens isn't as "fancy" since the optics are pretty standard (aka, you don't get swirly bokeh or cool lens flares because it's a factory-made modern plastic lens).

I for one enjoy having my kit lens even though I have 105mm, 58mm, and 28mm lenses. No, I don't use my kit for animating very often, but if you don't have the freedom of a wide range of focal lengths, you'll be seriously limited without your kit lens. A bunch of my films only used the 58mm, and while it isn't that obvious at first, all the shots look distant because of the long focal length.

Sometimes you just want that freedom to have a dramatic zoom-in (see: MECH) or to have a different focal length. If you can get a kit lens for only £20 extra, go for it. It's worth it. I mean, a DSLR is an investment anyway, so you if you can get an accessory for relatively inexpensively, you should.

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

If you are looking into getting a Canon and and thinking of opting out of the kit lens, looks for the option for the 40mm EF f2.8 lens, you will likely want a normal use lens with auto focus and that is a great little lens, and as a bonus the filter threads on it are 52mm just like all the Nikon lenses I suggest. I didn't really stop fully using my first kit lens till I had a few Canon lenses that replaced it [the 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 for super wide angle, the 40mm f/2.8 for normal length photos, and the 85mm f/1.8 for a little telephoto bokeh goodness] of course I have been slowly building my collection of glass up for almost 10 years now, so build slowly and learn to use what you got before you start itching for more mini/smile

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Thanks for all the advice guys! I may be able to get my camera this weekend, so I'm really excited! mini/bigsmile

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Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Hey guys I just found this form and is very helpful. This review of different lens are great but I have 1 question which has pry been brought up a billion times here so sorry. I'm looking to buy a new lens for my Nikon d3300, I have the regular lens 18-55mm the one that comes with the camera. So now I want a lens that has a good close up range and a high f/stop since I like alot of the picture in focus. However I'm trying to find a lens with little flicker. I've heard on sites that sometimes the stock lens aren't that great to use for stop motion. So now curious to see if any of these lens in this review have little to no flicker? Sorry if it was mentioned in there and I missed it, but just curious before I purchase a new lens. I wanna make sure my money is well spent before I blow it on a lens that isn't all that great. Thanks guys hope somebody can shed some light?

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

You'll need a macro lens for really close up things, but you can make any lens a macro lens by simply adding a set of very inexpensive macro filters. So my advice would be to get a macro lens that looks appealing  to you, or to get the best lens possible in accord with your needs and budget and then purchase some macro filters. A good thing about the macro filter option is that you can combine them (that is, screw them together) for even more magnification power. About the non-flicker. Flicker can happen for many reasons: Light reflecting off the animator, natural light (sunlight) coming on to the set, and many more. However the most common cause for a lens to cause flicker is an auto-aperture. The reason for this is beyond the purpose of this post, but in short: auto-aperture can cause irregular opening and closing of the aperture during exposures. If you get a lens with a manual aperture, that should prevent the lens from being the culprit of any light flicker. Check this out for some good tips on preventing flicker from causes outside of the lens.

-Brickman

Last edited by Brickman (April 11, 2017 (08:39pm))

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Awesome thanks for the help and quick response!:)

Re: The best lenses for your DSLR

Nikon kit lenses have a problem where it doesn't snap the aperture back to the exact same spot every time it takes a picture, causing aperture flickr, which is light flicker and depth of field flicker at the exact same time.

Like Brickman said, any lens you get can be made macro with macro filters, or even extension tubes (which have no glass, thus, no distortion). Older lenses on eBay are pretty good in price and quality, generally. Of course, there'll be some overpriced lemons, so watch for those. Check out the first page of this thread for some good recommendations of lenses.

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