Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

Whether it's a detail of enough importance to bother criticizing or not, I'd say the headline certainly qualifies as clickbait. And dishonest clickbait, at that. The brickfilming community is not "dead," nor is there a particular person or people you can blame for whatever changes you don't like because the landscape of internet video has changed so dramatically over the last 12 years or so. You were transparently doing it to get attention. Clickbait.

https://i.imgur.com/FF7ke3u.png

As far as my own hot take on the matter, I think the notion that most people think the period they were most involved was the best period is typically the case, unless you're trusting others who speak lovingly of their own perceived "golden age." My own personal impression would have been that the 2004-2008 time period was the golden age, shortly before YouTube really took off.

A brickfilm with comparatively high production values used to be a twice-a-year occurrence when I joined the community in 2001, and now there are several per week produced at that level. There is just so much mediocre-or-better content being published on the Internet now, and so many different channels for putting it out there, that the slightly more manageable, curated way things used to work isn't possible anymore.

http://i.imgur.com/wcmcdmf.png

Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

Nathan Wells wrote:

That's called clickbait and is a piss poor reason to choose such a title.

Ladies and gentlemen, the "golden age" of brickfilmers!

https://bricksafe.com/files/thistof/hillbillyheist/DtubeNowOnline2.png

Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

For what it's worth, I do think the suggestions at the end of the article are worthwhile, and am not really trying to put down Brick Tale's intentions overall. Regardless of whether we've fallen from a golden age I think it's great if the younger segment of the community (and I don't mean little kids, I mean university age and younger) wants to be active in building things up to be the way they think it should be.

If this community, whether that means BiM or something else, is to be revitalized in a meaningful way it's going to have to come from the next wave of people, not folks like myself who have grown up and gotten jobs in the film and video industry.

http://i.imgur.com/wcmcdmf.png

Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

By what standard are we measuring the liveliness of the brickfilming community? And perhaps more importantly, what do we say comprises the brickfilming community in the first place?

If we look at the raw numbers, there's no denying that brickfilming is at an all-time high. Animators like Titan Bricks, Hickox, and Ulrich are thriving on YouTube with their brickfilms. Fancy Pants, revered by many in this community, has recently pulled off a revival of his channel with steady view counts on each of his new films. BrickBrosProductions is thriving as well, receiving millions of hits on each of their new animations. And the LEGO Group itself is producing more stop-motion videos now than ever before, commissioning the likes of Dylan Woodley to create some of the most visually impressive advertising campaigns.

So, I think it's maybe a stretch to say that the Brickfilming scene is "dead" in the LEGO community. There are still large numbers of mainstream brickfilm creators and viewers alike.


But perhaps there is a distinction to be made between "lego movies" and "brickfilms"? A method for discerning between the soulless cash-grabs and the true art? A way to separate the weeb trash from the honorable, Brickcrazy-sanctioned anime?

It's hard to say. But do recognize the paradoxical nature of calling Hickox and the like outsiders, while still bemoaning the community's shift toward "nuanced filmmaking". You can't have your cake and eat it too. mini/tongue

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Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

^ This is why we sub to you, Pongowl.

Re: Let's discuss the "Who killed the brickfilming community?" article

Sméagol wrote:

A brickfilm with comparatively high production values used to be a twice-a-year occurrence when I joined the community in 2001, and now there are several per week produced at that level.

The community certainly doesn't look dead to me. Sure, it's no longer the frontier it was, but it's grown above and beyond that.