Topic: Language in brickfilms

Want to know your opinion on swear words being used in brickfilms. I have considered this, and I only used language in one of my films, and that language was in a clip as that brickfilm was promoting another channel. In some topics, language could be more realistic. I don't know. What do you think?

Re: Language in brickfilms

funmiproductions wrote:

Want to know your opinion on swear words being used in brickfilms. I have considered this, and I only used language in one of my films, and that language was in a clip as that brickfilm was promoting another channel. In some topics, language could be more realistic. I don't know. What do you think?


I have the same stance on this in brickfilms, as I do normal movies.

Yes, sometimes swear words can be used portray a certain character better, (for example, a depressing guy who hates life). Also, I find it can add more chaos to a scene that portrays a life and death situation (For example, if a train is about to crash, the people on it would definitely use those words in reality). However, in comedies, although it may sometimes be funny, I see no point in it.


If you constantly hear these words thrown around, then eventually, they start slipping out of your mouth every once and awhile. mini/shifty "See no evil do no evil" mini/cat .


I think this way with brickfilms as well. Honestly, I don't want to see the little plastic toys that make me happy throwing around the "F-word". mini/no Even in serious brickfilms, I think it should be used very sparingly, you can only achieve a certain level of realism in a brickfilm anyway (They are plastic toys, after all).

Last edited by PushOverProductions (September 13, 2013 (02:16pm))

no more brickfilming *sad face*.

Re: Language in brickfilms

I think there are already a few topics like this one.

To sum up: some people dislike it in any context, some people think it's illogical to consider it really "bad", others avoid it just to not offend people, and some believe it more realistic since there are many real people who do it, and some think that it just doesn't fit with the child-like nature of LEGO, however, some find it humourous because it's a kid's toy.

Re: Language in brickfilms

I honestly don't care if there's swears in a brickfilm. Though, I don't think they should be just throwing around swear words to make something funny. THey can if they wish, but it most likely won't improve it humorously.

Re: Language in brickfilms

Whatever you do, you do what you want.  It's your brickfilm, not ours.

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Re: Language in brickfilms

i agree with lech
it's like do whatever you want, follow your creative vision

if you don't like using cuss words, don't use cuss words. if you do like using cuss words, use cuss words! it's whatever you want to do. don't do what other people tell you to do, do what you want to do.

what could have been: jeffrey and the old man make some robots
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Re: Language in brickfilms

Ducking heck! Shuck got duckin' real, ya fletchin' sunnava duck!

In all seriousness, I'm not a fan of naughty words in brickfilms. It just doesn't feel right, and I don't find it funny. Same with gun violence in brickfilms. I just don't like it.

Have you seen a big-chinned boy?

Re: Language in brickfilms

I think it depends a lot. There seems to be a certain genre of brickfilms where kids show their mature by having the characters swear and with lots of gory violence and that's okay to me. However, if it is contextually okay to do so, and you warn that it has language in it, I will be fine with it. For example, the swearing scene in The King's Speech was good, while in Argo it seemed like they had swearing to have the R rating.

Re: Language in brickfilms

I don't like swearing in brickfilms and I find it pretty pointless especially when it's constantly happening in the film and if you do put language in you should put a warning so people like me who don't like it can avoid the bad language.

Re: Language in brickfilms

I am a hypocrite. I'm sorry.

Last edited by Legocloniac477 (September 18, 2013 (04:03pm))

"I wear black even when I'm not animating. I'm like a walking funeral parlor."
-PushOverProductions

Re: Language in brickfilms

Or if you are shooting for so much realism that you add language, why are you using a plastic kid's toy? Normally doing a live action film portrays a lot more realism than minifigures.

Re: Language in brickfilms

Mighty Wanderer wrote:

Or if you are shooting for so much realism that you add language, why are you using a plastic kid's toy?

because it's interesting! trying to make a realistic/edgy/dark film using legos is a pretty interesting thing to do! it's always cool when someone does something with a lot of depth or realistic characters with legos! experimenting is good!!

what could have been: jeffrey and the old man make some robots
                      art page -- tumblr --youtube
              bricksinmotion's #13th best curmudgeon

Re: Language in brickfilms

Mighty Wanderer wrote:

Or if you are shooting for so much realism that you add language, why are you using a plastic kid's toy? Normally doing a live action film portrays a lot more realism than minifigures.


Getting the money for thousands of dollars worth of equipment, going and paying tons for location; getting actors and crew together is a lot more difficult than animating some Lego in your room.

"I wear black even when I'm not animating. I'm like a walking funeral parlor."
-PushOverProductions

Re: Language in brickfilms

Legocloniac477 wrote:
Mighty Wanderer wrote:

Or if you are shooting for so much realism that you add language, why are you using a plastic kid's toy? Normally doing a live action film portrays a lot more realism than minifigures.


Getting the money for thousands of dollars worth of equipment, going and paying tons for location; getting actors and crew together is a lot more difficult than animating some Lego in your room.

Who says you need all that just to make a realistic film? (Of course, you do have to pay for location if you want to film in a public place).

You just disgraced hundreds of DIY filmmakers.

no more brickfilming *sad face*.

Re: Language in brickfilms

While I agree that Legocloniac is being slightly hyperbolic, the fact remains that making a quality brickfilm is more feasible for the majority of young-ish people than making a quality live-action film. The necessity of having talented people physically on set for a live-action film is a huge impediment to people without a large circle of acquaintances. If you look at a selection of indie-films, it's usually clear when the director's ambition overreached his or her abilities/budget; that's not inherently a bad thing when your goal is to develop as a director in the long term. However, if you're just aiming to make quality films as a hobby, I'd argue that's more achievable with animation for most children and teenagers.

Re: Language in brickfilms

PushOverProductions wrote:

You just disgraced hundreds of DIY filmmakers.

I misspoke, I'm sorry. I was trying to make a point.

But even DIY filmmakers have to spend lots of cash.

"I wear black even when I'm not animating. I'm like a walking funeral parlor."
-PushOverProductions

Re: Language in brickfilms

Swearing can be an artform when used correctly. Obviously, I refrain from it more in Brickfilms because the audience is younger and so they find swearing distracting (it can actually be quite funny coming up with overly-obvious ways of masking swearing - such as "Mother Duck" and "Dumb Feces"), although 'bugger' remains one of my favourite words because of how 'English' it sounds.

I think Billy Connolly put it best.

EDIT: I've just stumbled upon this video that I used to be a fan of when I was but a wee lad. Its...pretty bad. The Censored Version is actually slightly funnier (sometimes beeps are funnier than the actual thing), but its a prime example of swearing replacing wit. The idea that these Knights are completely breaking character starts off as funny (and the first guy getting eaten is actually really well timed), but it doesn't go anywhere and the whole novelty is that they swear a lot - which isn't a very original or amusing novelty. It would at least be funnier if this was a Christian Bale-style tirade launched at the group after some strong buildup.

Last edited by Max Butcher (September 14, 2013 (03:31pm))

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Re: Language in brickfilms

Just Kidden wrote:

i agree with lech
it's like do whatever you want, follow your creative vision

if you don't like using cuss words, don't use cuss words. if you do like using cuss words, use cuss words! it's whatever you want to do. don't do what other people tell you to do, do what you want to do.

yo like

this

all of this

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"Why in the world did you do a weird language if you know English?" - tenny1028

Re: Language in brickfilms

Legocloniac477 wrote:
Mighty Wanderer wrote:

Or if you are shooting for so much realism that you add language, why are you using a plastic kid's toy? Normally doing a live action film portrays a lot more realism than minifigures.


Getting the money for thousands of dollars worth of equipment, going and paying tons for location; getting actors and crew together is a lot more difficult than animating some Lego in your room.

I think there are multiple types of realism. Like Finding Nemo for example. The film itself is absurd, because the fish talk. Never mind the fact that clown fish are hermaphrodites in real life, while the two main ones are male in the film. So it is not realistic in that sense whatsoever. However the interactions between the characters, and the characters themselves, are very realistic. And I feel like cursing for realism falls into the second category, be it to preserve the integrity of a genre (cursing is a characteristic of some action movies for example) or to characterize (like what is a sailor without his curse words?)

Re: Language in brickfilms

We all have free speech.
But we all must use it responsibility.
I persoanlly don't want to watch such brickfilms, nor do I want to make them.  It's almost always unnecessary, and why do something unnecessary when you know there's a whole segment of audience that won't watch it because of it.

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