Topic: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Welcome to the Weekly Bricks in Motion Filmmaking & Brickfilming Discussion thread!
These threads are designed to inspire discussion, debate and discourse on the topics of filmmaking, brickfilming, storytelling and LEGO. Each week I will start a new thread with a new discussion topic. Everyone is welcome to contribute as long as you have something thoughtful to say. Paragraphs are encouraged! If you are going to participate in this thread, please keep the discussion civil and refrain from pointless jokes, image macros, or “memes.”

Please stay on topic and keep your comments civil and respectful of other members.

Feel free to continue to contribute to the previous discussion threads as well. Just because they are older doesn't mean they aren't relevant any more!

Previous Discussions:
Week 1: Why LEGO?
Week 2: Dealing with the Mockers
Week 3: Brickfilms with Licensed Themes
Week 4: Challenges Unique to Brickfilmers
Week 5: For Mature Audiences Only
Week 6: Please Like, Comment and Subscribe


This week’s discussion topic:

What area(s) of brickfilming, if any, could be improved?

Previously, improving camera quality and accessibility to quality editing software and online storage to host brickfilms were big issues. Now, in the age of high-quality webcams, cheap software and YouTube, what in brickfilming can be improved now? Storytelling? Better representation of female characters? A wider range of represented genres? Respect, discussion and discourse in the forums? Something else entirely?

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Storytelling for sure. SO many brickfilms with mindless violence and fart jokes. I've done it, but mostly just to attract viewers. There is not many brickfilms highlighting girls, unless they are the damsels in distress in superhero brickfilms.
Comedy and action seem to be to two most popular genres when it comes to brickfilms.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Also to mention the common complaint of certain themes that are way over done. I usually don't watch brickfilms simply because they are mostly stupid and terrible. I do admit that all of the videos I've ever made fit into this category almost perfectly, hence why I don't really do it as much anymore.

"I wear black even when I'm not animating. I'm like a walking funeral parlor."
-PushOverProductions

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

funmiproductions wrote:

Comedy and action seem to be to two most popular genres when it comes to brickfilms.

I think those are the most popular genres because are the two easiest things to convey to most. I mean, horror and dramatic brickfilms can be harder to pull off (at least for me).

My biggest problem with having female characters is finding female voice actresses, but there are a few around here occasionally. I have nothing against female characters, but there are just way more male voice actors around.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Gender equality seems like a big issue in Brickfilming. I can count the number of female brickfilmer's I'm aware of using one hand. Since the pool of female voice actresses is only slightly larger, this also means that relatively few films are female centric (plus the large majority of lego minifgs tend to be male anyway). There are some good brickfilms that have female protagonists (How Not to Rob a Bank, for one), but they are relatively few.

I also want to see longer films. Two of my favorite brickfilms are The Package 3 and Bestia, which are an hour long and 20 minutes long respectively. I find longer films to be more memorable as they strive to achieve much more than tell a few jokes or show minifigures fighting. While making longer brickfilms is hard work, I wish more accomplished filmmakers would attempt them more.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Several things,
One being that we lean less on fancy lighting, big detailed sets and flashy effects to make our films good, and look back to the core issues of storytelling, pacing, and character development. I've seen a lot of comments that say "Great animation and effects, but why did X happen/Why did X do that/why didn't you spend more time explaining X?" And it seems that we sometimes race to make the technical aspects great, but forget those things that can't be immediately seen on-screen. (Myself included!) Not that those are bad, but we must remember that those are like the toppings on ice cream. There are great, can add a lot, and are easily seen (being on top level) but that we need a good foundation or all that is just fluff.

Yes, we don't see many female driven shorts, but that's probably because we don't have many female voice actors, it's a male dominated hobby, and we just don't stop to think about such things. Could we change the male to female ratio a bit? Sure. But there are several things that just don't make that quite as easy as some may think.

As to genres, yeah, there's a lot of light comedies, and seemingly less serious and dramatic films than of times past.
We've got a lot of mindless action films, but a bit of a search can still yield some good, deeper films nowadays. Not as many as we'd probably like, but that could change.

I think another thing missing is the longer runtimes. It seems that most films now are about five minutes or less. There's nothing wrong with that, but it'd be nice to see increased numbers of longer, more involved and developed, films.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

For me it is writing. There are way too many comedies and nonsense films. This also goes for action and fanfic films. Would like to see people explore other genres. I think by pursuing other genres the story telling and writing of brickfilms will greatly improve. I feel most brickfilms suffer from lazy writing which is suited for these types of films. I am very guilty of this myself and I have been working on improving my writing.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Storytelling, characters, themes. Brickfilmers should know that they don't have to follow a formula. LEGO emphasizes freedom and creativity. So let your mind wander. No need to follow everyone else.

If you really wanna make a Star Wars brickfilm, then make it. But be sure it's the best thing you could create. People think the medium is oversaturated with dumb, pointless franchise videos--what'll make your video not dumb?

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

I think that now is the time to focus on audio editing. I've seen many great brickfilms, and, though I am not an audiophile (one who thinks that only .wav, .aiff, and other lossless formats should be listened to), I have seen some films that I would have liked better, had the audio been mixed better.

Directing and Cinematography, though taught in schools, is more of a learned technique. Such is acting and animating as well. - All have a basis (cycles, rules, and tricks) that are pretty much cut-and-dry similar in all films, but, again, these are all things that are learned, and, done differently by most everybody.

However, audio mixing is also a very important, learned yet sometimes taught, process... The only problem is; It's not very well known. Many brickfilmers (for lack of a better term) slap together their films in an editing program, layer audio (such as voices, music, and sound effects), and then export. No attention is given to "clipping," "bass vs treble," "panning left vs right," and, sometimes "background noise" is also wrongfully overlooked too!

If more attention was given, or was automatically done in a program, to audio, then, I think that many brickfilms would improve! (I think we've all seen films where there's no footsteps, for example. And, though it's such a small little thing, it DOES make a difference, to me at least. It makes the film seem, at the very least, a little more realistic)

Lighting issues are also a great point to bring up, however, I think that that issue has been pretty much covered so far by the other posters. mini/smile

Pritchard Studios wrote:

...We don't see many female driven shorts, but that's probably because we don't have many female voice actors, it's a male dominated hobby,

IDK why, but, I've ALWAYS wanted to do a female-lead driven series. I tend to find those stories the most interesting, and, have dabbled in that field in some short-stories, however, have never been able to make a brickfilm on it, as, there ARE so few voice actresses.

I've been very lucky to have worked with Scarheart. (a brickfilmer an youtube, who's also got an account on here, I think) She's not only helped me with my writing, but, has agreed to play Pippin Reed in my upcoming Johnny Thunder/Adventurers brickfilm... It's too bad that there aren't more like her active in our community. If there were, I'm sure they'd have their work cut-out for them. mini/tongue

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

I agree that the most deficient part of brickfilming is the writing.  When a ell-written brickfilm comes around, everyone takes notice.  If you watch my own comedy series, my technical aspects are not the best, but I strive in my writing to make something that will inspire lego animators who view them to write solid, quality material.

And since it's come up, the lack of female voices is a problem that we should address.  I've found other resources outside the brickfilm community to find female vocals and new semi-regular characters who are appearing in future episodes.  I don't know how much responsibility it is on our part to recruit females to brickfilming, but I'd like to see more, and with the proliferation of Lego Friends, one would expect to see an increase in girls making lego cartoons.

Dyland, I need to find more female roles.  Is scar heart active here?  I think I remembered her from a year ago.

https://vimeo.com/channels/holdingourown      http://holding-our-own.tumblr.com

"None practice tolerance less frequently than those who most loudly preach it."

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Nathan Wells wrote:

Better representation of female characters?

I'd like to have more female characters in brickfilms, though the troubling problem with it is there are so few female brickfilmers.  It's not really the fault of the brickfilmer himself for not representing females that well.  Most people tend to like to voice things themselves and have their closer brickfilming comrades voice as well, but by doing this you can't really get female characters since there are so few in the community.

I've managed to make two brickfilm with a double female lead, and Welcome to Darkmoor has a Female protagonist.  I also have two planned brickfilms with female leads.  For the first I'm still unsure who I'm going to have play the heroine, but for the second I've specifically dodged the voice acting problem by making the main character mute.

I have several other non-brickfilm stories where the main character is female, like Riigo-Faloo, but sadly I can't make her in LEGO, so nothing can come of that in a brickfilm.

But having more female characters in brickfilms is something I certainly would like to see more.  However, I doubt that the imbalance could be rectified until we have more female brickfilmers in the community, but I'm not sure at all how I could do that.  Go up to random girls and tell them to brickfilm?  I don't know.  But If I ever have a daughter I'll teach her to brickfilm, maybe then there will be slightly more.

I'd echo what Dyland said about sound stuff.  I try very hard with my stuff and even make all of my sounds my self though only do my sound in mono.  I've spent hours editing and recording sounds to get them just right.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Pritchard Studios wrote:

Yes, we don't see many female driven shorts, but that's probably because we don't have many female voice actors, it's a male dominated hobby, and we just don't stop to think about such things. Could we change the male to female ratio a bit? Sure. But there are several things that just don't make that quite as easy as some may think.

See this isn't a problem for me, as I have pretty much any female character I need sorted. My mother's a professional voice over artist.

That said, I don't think gender ratios are actually that important; it's quality. Forgetting the movies, if you read The Lord of the Rings there are very few active female characters, but that doesn't matter. We get Eowyn, who starts off as a mere shield maiden and ends up stabbing pure, unadulterated, physical evil in the face where men and even kings fail. Throwing in additional female characters is unnecessary if you have one that really stands out. And if you read Y: The Last Man, it's the opposite: there's only one male character. Everyone else is female, as that's the premise of the series. It becomes deeply interesting watching a man wander an all-female world. So in summary, it's not about the gender ratio in itself, but about how it corresponds to the story in question. Game of Thrones gets it marvellously right, while the Star Wars expanded canon often takes it too far and exploits its largely male readership. It ultimately comes down to good writing.

I think storytelling is important, but it depends on what you as the brickfilmer are setting out to do. If you're setting out to hone your skills as an animator, before putting the time into creating a larger and more demanding project, then I can understand seeing a test montage or a fight sequence appear in my subscription feed. If you're setting out to do that larger and more demanding project, then storytelling becomes essential.

That said, I think a lot of newer brickfilmers get lost in the former. It's so easy just to animate a guy walking forwards, or to do a series of unrelated clips, and keep doing that while you try to come up with a good idea for a story, but if you want to develop your skills, you should challenge yourself and push to invent something. As has been said before, that can be true of licensed IP brickfilms as much as it is for original ones, and I do think this is an area where a lot of brickfilmers can improve.

In order to try to do that, I set myself a challenge last year. Every time I bought one of the collectible minifigures, I had to come up with a brickfilm for it (not necessarily make it, but work out a story at least). That's actually how La Conquista came about - I got the Conquistador, and started thinking of stories for him. The first thing I came up with was what might happen if he discovered he hadn't explored part of south America first, and I'd just been on holiday to Iceland and learned all about Leif Erikson, hence the vikings. To be honest, I'm pretty happy that I did go for as wacky a brickfilm as that was, and I think a lot of people miss out on the rewarding feeling you get after creating something that truly has your own individual stamp on it.

In terms of genre, I'd love to see people branch out a bit more. When I first started brickfilming, it was all about two-guys-in-a-flat, and while brickfilmers like Nathan and MindGame produced some excellent brickfilms, it was a phase. There was then a brief classic space phase, an ongoing superhero trend, and a medieval phase. What I'd really like to see is more original fantasy. While the medieval stuff is good, I'd love it if people tried more urban fantasy or a bit of Greek or Japanese myth. There's a lot more material than dwarves and goblins if you look a bit further - there are Russian frog-men, gold-eating phoenixes, zombie dragons, werepires and oceans made out of milk - and I'd love to see what people could come up with if they put their minds to it

Also, the most iconic stop-motion films of all time are monster movies, primarily those of Ray Harryhausen. Stuff like the satyroid cyclops in The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad really sticks in your mind, and it'd be nice to see more brickfilmers try monster animation. With the Mixel ball-and-socket joints, this has become even more accessible, and is something I personally plan to explore in the fall (assuming I can brickfilm at university). Basically, more non-minifigure animation would be welcome in my eyes.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/ZoefDeHaas/stuff/sig1.png
"Nothing goes down 'less I'm involved. No nuggets. No onion rings. No nothin'. A cheeseburger gets sold in the park, I want in! You got fat while we starved on the streets...now it's my turn!" -Harley Morenstein

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Nathan Wells wrote:

What area(s) of brickfilming, if any, could be improved?

Previously, improving camera quality and accessibility to quality editing software and online storage to host brickfilms were big issues. Now, in the age of high-quality webcams, cheap software and YouTube, what in brickfilming can be improved now? Storytelling? Better representation of female characters? A wider range of represented genres? Respect, discussion and discourse in the forums? Something else entirely?


Storytelling is probably the main thing, and the themes used.  In this age of YouTube fame and glory, there is a huge focus on short brickfilms (I'd say < 3:00) with a single joke/punchline or just for an action scene or IP character to do something cool.  Comedy is also big now, and quite frankly, overdone.  People seem to have this mental block about using a brickfilm to tell a serious story, especially the YouTube crowd.  Don't get me wrong, I really do enjoy comedy/action scenes/IP brickfilms and actually watch most of them that are decent, I'm not hating on anyone here.  There's just too many of them, bandwagons ftw?

I think this kind of ties into the whole thing about people focusing too much with trying to get YouTube views and subscribers, rather than making original or story-based brickfilms.  Almost every one of the films in the past few years that the majority of brickfilmers would consider classics, are longer than 2-3 minutes and are based on a new, original story (or putting a new spin on older ideas).  I'd really like to see more thought out, serious, longer films than a ton of shootouts, one-joke comedies, and IP brickfilms. 
I believe that's the main issue with brickfilming in the current brickfilming world.

Representation of female characters is not very good, but that is because the brickfilming crowd is almost entirely made up of males.  I don't really foresee that changing much. 

The technical quality of brickfilms seems to be getting progressively better as the hobby becomes more wide spread, and is something that anyone who continues with it for very long will eventually learn and upgrade their hardware/software.

Discussion in the forums could certainly be better.  These discussions you've been doing has been a great start to making that better.  So many users just don't want to think and put any time into their posts (especially the younger ages, of which there's a large amount), which makes meaningful discussion fairly few and far between. 

The final thing I think could be improved is getting feedback or reviews on films.  I know, I'm a hypocrite, I don't usually review films very much, even ones I watch and really enjoy.  I'm just pointing out something I think brickfilmers as a whole (YouTube, BricksinMotion, probably Brickfilms.com) are really lacking on.

That is all I have to say for now.

EDIT: I purposely wrote this without reading any prior posts so I wouldn't be influenced by those, but I definitely agree about the sound mixing/editing.  So many filmmakers in general, brickfilmers (beginning and experienced) especially,  seem to forget that a film with an okay picture and filming with good sound can still be good, the best camera, animation, and editing quality film with bad sound will still be near-unwatchable.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

I don't feel that like we can say the genre of brickfilms as a whole needs to expands, a lot of genres are easier to make as a brickfilm then as a live action, try making a sci-fi or super hero movie in live action, it's going to be a lot harder then using LEGO. If you don't like that I'm making sci-fi films that don't take them selves seriously, or that other people are making super hero or Starwars film that's not a problem with brickfilming, it's a problem with you

For me the what I really need to work on is character development. None of the films I have written have any characters for all intents and purposes. The casting call I sent out for my current project looked like this:

Major Parts:
Police 1 (protagonist, male/female)
Police 2 (sidekick, male/female)
Dr. Dementia (antagonist, ideally Webster)
President (male)
-removed for spoilers- (male, possibly digitally altered)

Minor parts:
Ecologist 1 (male/female)
Ecologist 2 (male/female)
Ecologist 3 (male/female)
Adviser (male/female)
Man (male)
Woman (female)
Henchmen (male/female)

All the parts are about as deep and nuanced as you would expect from there names. While there isn't any character development in the script I still feel like it was my strongest script, mostly because I think I overcame the last hurdler that was challenging me: anti-climatic endings. I first realized it was a problem  when someone gave me some feedback on Attack of the Evil Robotic Turkey From Outer Space, I think it may have been RevMan, but the complaint was: "Not enough evil robotic turkey rampage, and a disappointing final battle." [Both very true, it's one of my worst films] I feel like it's taken me some time to over come this, and hopefully 4 or so films later I can finally have something that has a satisfying ending.

Now my next project will have to work on character development, and I think to get any real kind of development the length of my movies is going to have to increase a bit, just so the characters have room to breath and the audience has time to learn who they are. If I could make a script that was half as good as Bee and Puppycat I would be SO HAPPY! The first five minuets of that is used just setting Bee up as a believable character and by the time she and Puppycat ever fish bowl space you really know who she is. Little details like the awkward relationship she has with her neighbor, her vices, and all of that is explained just by showing how she interacts with the world. The next five minuets you start to learn about Puppycan, they didn't try to cram all of his/her character in the same space that you were leaning about Bee. These are all things I need to think about when I turn my next idea into a script, how fast to create a character, how many can I have in a given length of time and so on.

I think if you want to talk about brickfilming on a broader scale, we could use better teamwork, we have a lot of different filmmakers that are good at different things and if more of them could work together and get people who were good a writing scripts, or even just proofing scripts and refining ideas we could see more large scale projects. The fact that I am working by my self after doing most of my older projects with one other animator/composer has made it harder for me to motivate myself to work quickly, and even if I was just as motivated as I was working as a team it would still take twice as long for me to make a film.

and to touch on the gender equality issue, the best way to deal with that is own good recording equipment and ask women you know to do voice work for you. You don't need to be good friends with them, you just need to know them well enough that they don't think you're creepy. You might be surprised at who says yes, the worst they can do is say no. If you act professional I don't think they will think it's weird, they might get excited about the project. Have printed copies of the script with proper formatting, have a mic stand and a pop filter, they will feel like they are getting involved in your art (which they are) and they will feel a bit like a star. It's always nice to supply some food, they are helping you out after all, the least you can do is pay for a meal for them during the voice acting session.

I personally don't like to get voice actors online because if you can have two actors in the same room you have more flexibility with the dialog, which sometimes just sounds unnatural when you end up hearing it out loud, but sometimes that can't be helped, and not everyone can afford good recording equipment.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

As has been said before, there isn't a whole lot of depth of story and characters these days in brickfilms. I think that perhaps the reason for this trend (and if you disagree with me, go ahead and please say so, I'm speaking mainly from my own experience), a lot of people who got into brickfilming ten years ago did so because it was the most accessible way to tell a story in a film format; a teenager couldn't make a decent live action short back then, the tools just weren't there for those without literal piles of money. But now a lot more of the brickfilming community has started because it just looked cool; I started brickfilming because I like LEGO, 5 years ago I could not have cared less about story structure and character development. Over the years brickfilming has really gotten me into film, but writing is much harder to learn than animation. I think a lot of brickfilmers now just don't give a whole lot of thought to the depth of a script because they're really only interested in visuals. I also think that this new generation of brickfilmers will mature, a lot of the less passionate will be weeded out as they move on with their lives, and with a new group of mature brickfilmers we'll get another wave of more thought provoking brickfilms.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

funmiproductions wrote:

Storytelling for sure...

AquaMorph wrote:

For me it is writing. There are way too many comedies and nonsense films. This also goes for action and fanfic films. Would like to see people explore other genres.

JonnDthunDer wrote:

Storytelling is probably the main thing, and the themes used.  In this age of YouTube fame and glory, there is a huge focus on short brickfilms (I'd say < 3:00) with a single joke/punchline or just for an action scene or IP character to do something cool.  Comedy is also big now, and quite frankly, overdone.  People seem to have this mental block about using a brickfilm to tell a serious story, especially the YouTube crowd.

backyardlegos wrote:

...if you disagree with me, go ahead and please say so, I'm speaking mainly from my own experience

Several people have brought up the fact that "modern brickfilms don't have very good stories," and, though I don't want to argue, I don't think that that is really an "area of improvement" that the brickfilming community as a whole can improve on. - Only can individual storytellers and filmmakers do this.

Pritchard Studios wrote:

I think another thing missing is the longer run times. It seems that most films now are about five minutes or less. There's nothing wrong with that, but it'd be nice to see increased numbers of longer, more involved and developed, films.

I've written a pretty good (If I do say so myself) brickfilm based on Johnny Thunder and the Adventurers. However, this script is 30 pages long, and thus, the final film will be at least 30 minutes in itself, not taking into consideration how long it will take to build the sets, animate and film, edit, master, and upload my brickfilm. - The extra time it takes me to do this may be because of perfectionism, or due to the fact that I strive for better animation, and less lighting flicker. But, I think that, in the film's relation to the case of this discussion, good stories take a long time. - That time, many brickfilmers either don't have. (Or, they're making the time... but, it'll be weeks, months, or even years before their film is finally put out there)

I could complain in the same vein about how bad writers are saturating the market right now (i.e. Twilight, Twilight, Twilight, etc.) but I won't, because I know that there are still great writers out there (Stephen King, J.K. Rowling, etc.). However, when was the last time King or Rowling published a book? (aside from King's recent publication) I can't think of ANY within the last 3 years. Does that make them bad at their craft, no. But, it does go to show that in a business where fame and fortune is really about timing, not quality; crap does get through. Such as the case of brickfilms.

I once thought the same way, and disregarded most brickfilms made since 2010. However, once I came upon Pritchard's "Steampunk," Nathan Well's Comeback "Alex and Derrek: 5 Years Later," and several others, I realized that the problem wasn't that there are more bad brickfilms made today, but rather, that the bad brickfilms that were made years ago aren't as well known/have been deleted.

In another 4 years, I bet I'll come across some discussions on how there are no good brickfilms since 2014, and, I'll know that they're wrong.

Again, this all wraps up with what I started with: It's not the community, or even the films that are to blame. It is the storytellers and filmmakers who are to blame.

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Nathan Wells wrote:

Respect, discussion and discourse in the forums?

I would have brushed that one aside about a month ago, but, after witnessing the battle within Week 5's discussion, I think that this area actually could use a little more attention. mini/tongue

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

We should make a list of "bad" things at the top of this thread and each of us promise to "fix" at least one issue in their next brick film.  By increments we can be the fixer of the collective problem.  mini/sunnies

Aka Fox
Youtube: My channel   Twitter: @animationantics
Best brick films: My selection

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

Pritchard Studios wrote:

Several things,
One being that we lean less on fancy lighting, big detailed sets and flashy effects to make our films good, and look back to the core issues of storytelling, pacing, and character development.

I wouldn't throw out the baby with the bathwater.  Storytelling is highly important, yes, but so are lighting, effects, and sets.  Film is a visual medium, after all.  It doesn't matter whether you have the greatest story/plot ever if the resulting film is completely unwatchable.  If a brickfilm had an inherently good story but headache-inducing 3FPS animation and multicoloured sets I probably wouldn't be able to finish it.  If it came down to it, I would probably pick good storytelling over flashy animation, but it's not a good idea to consider plots and storytelling to be the be-all-and-end-all.  I do agree though, I would love to see more serious brickfilms.  And long ones too; I miss the epic, 10-minute brickfilms.  Something from the "classic" age of brickfilming, but with modern set design and visual quality--that would be incredible.  (Although I suppose we have Copyright, Egyptian Holiday, Pirates Rule!, et al....)

I definitely agree with what's been said about gender representation.  I personally really want to make more brickfilms with female characters, but I'm not sure how I'd pull that off given the lack of female brickfilmers/voice actors, and I'm not entirely sure I'd be able to write "good" female characters.

I must confess I feel rather bad now that everyone is saying they're tired of comedies, since the next brickfilm I intend to make is going to be a weird comedy that will be, by my current estimates, about 8 minutes long and will be probably my most time-consuming work yet.  Though hopefully it will be unlike any brickfilm comedy you've seen--in a good way.  [If it helps any, the next brickfilm that I intend to make after that will be a very serious brickfilm for Jampot's 2015 contest.  For obvious reasons the plot will remain secret, but it will involve deaths.]

I suppose this is links back to Week 5 and is somewhat off-topic, but perhaps the reason there are so many brickfilm comedies is because comedies are inherently easier to write.  There's something inherently fun and slightly goofy about LEGO, and since it's largely associated with childhood for most people it makes sense that it's easier to make fun brickfilms.  With serious brickfilms, while it's definitely possible to make one, there's always the risk that the right tone won't be struck and it won't come off as believable.  For my part, I'm apprehensive that my serious brickfilm won't hit the tone right and will either come off as too clichéd or pretentious or that tiny plastic people dying won't seem very credible.  (Then again, I'm always paranoid that my work will be bad/clichéd/demented/whatever.)  Still, brickfilming to me has always been about having fun, experimenting and pushing the limits to see what will and won't work.

Anyway, sorry if I went somewhat off-topic there and talked too much about myself (I get the feeling that I tend to talk a lot about what I intend to do rather than actually doing it... mini/confused  )

Last edited by Mr Vertigo (June 17, 2014 (08:30am))

Retribution (3rd place in BRAWL 2015)

&Smeagol      make the most of being surrounded by single, educated women your own age on a regular basis in college
AquaMorph    I dunno women are expensive

Re: Brickfilming Discussion Week 7: Areas of Improvement

FlyingMinifig wrote:

Storytelling is highly important, yes, but so are lighting, effects, and sets.  Film is a visual medium, after all.

Some film scholars feel that film should be completely dialogue-free for this reason. I don't totally agree with them, but I do see some merit in this viewpoint - that you can tell a story purely on image, no voices needed. Some brickfilmers are of a similar opinion, too, though no names immediately spring to mind.

Sorry, bit of a deviation there.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/ZoefDeHaas/stuff/sig1.png
"Nothing goes down 'less I'm involved. No nuggets. No onion rings. No nothin'. A cheeseburger gets sold in the park, I want in! You got fat while we starved on the streets...now it's my turn!" -Harley Morenstein